Results for the Spring 2013 Photography Competition

May 10th, 2013

We had some stunning entires for this competition, and as we try to do for every contest, our judges vary in style and focus. Judging this competition were Carl Caylor (his thrid time to judge) and Padraic Deasy, as well as Michael Gilbert for the second time whose work has been featured at the International Museum of Photography and is collected internationally as part of the collections of Epson, Canon, Hahnemuhle, Olympus, Mitsubishi, and Kodak. In 2006 he was a featured photographer at Photokina, the worlds largest photography event. (links to the work of these exciting photographers can soon be found in the darkroom).

The winner of the Camera Obscura Journal summer 2012 prize for professional photography is:
Omer Chatziserif for his image “Nude Meaning”

The winner of the Camera Obscura Journal prize for non-professional photography is:
Michael Bilotta for “Riddles in the Dark”

For the complete list of results (along with some images of previous winners).
Many of the finalists will be included in the upcoming Camera Obscura Journal due out in August of 2012. To see images from past issue no longer available for sale, join us on Facebook or Twitter.

Here are the guidelines for the Winter Photography Competition (already underway).

-MEP

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Bridge the Gap Co-Winners

May 9th, 2013

For the first time since the inception of Bridge the Gap, we have two winners. Two images, two distinct interpretations, two compelling stories. Have a look through the Bridge the Gap gallery (the top two stories in the upper left of the gallery at the bottom of the page). Dee Pratt’s “The Price of a Fine Coat” and Anna-Marie McLemore “The Maquila Queen”

The next bridge is currently open.

-MEP

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Finalists in the Current Photography Competition

April 23rd, 2013

Since I have received a number of inquires about the results, I will post the finalists here. When the judges make their selections the winner will be announced (hopefully in a week or so). We received some fantastic work for this competition. Narrowing them down to a handful of finalists is never easy.

Finalists for the professional category (in no particular order)

Assaf Matarasso,
Barbara Breitsameter,
Catherin Colaw,
Cole Thompson,
Christopher Ruane,
Cristina Venedict,
Dorn Brothers,
Frances Melhop,
Guido Dingemans,
Javier Arcenillas,
Midori Jordan,
Michael Bilotta,
Omer Chatziserif,
Stuart Chape,
Saeed Rezvanian,
William & Katherine Horton

Finalists for the non-professional category (in no particular order)

Alan Phelps,
Daniel Butcher,
Dareen Hussein,
Gerry Dotto,
Goran Jovic,
Hugh Jones,
J Hackett Maus,
Johan Brattheim,
Keith Urry,
Kem Oleg,
Michael Bilotta,
Nigel Bullers,
Stella Rothe

Thanks for your patience.
-MEP

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Camera Obscura Number 6 Takes Form

March 27th, 2013

 

With the photography competition deadline looming April 1, I’ll offer a peek at some of the stories slated to appear in the next issue starting with Sarah Scoles’ “When the World is Covered,” which begins:

“Nothing, except knowing someone who dies, makes you think about dying more than falling in love. When they are five minutes late, you are sure that they’ve crashed their car and been attacked by hordes of giant spiders. When they go out on a walk, you are sure that they will fall victim to armed robbery, or be taken captive by an evangelical cult. The way you want them around so much makes you so afraid that they are going to die that you become fairly sure that they are constantly about to die. That’s why I say, “Don’t die,” when Laura goes out after the flood to buy more nonperishables.

“I won’t,” she says, pushing her wallet into her back pocket. “I’m not really a die-er.”

“I know,” I say. “Thank you for that.”

Sarah Scoles is an associate editor at Astronomy magazine. She enjoys noticing details, stealing acquaintances’ anecdotes, running really far on woodland trails, talking to her dog, reading everything that’s fit to be read, and contemplating the universe’s expansion. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in the Alaska Quarterly Review, LIT, Whiskey Island, Upstreet, DIAGRAM, Eastown Fiction, LIT, Fringe, and Booth.


This issue will also include Ricardo Nuila’s “Tunk.”

“Or the guy who, when I asked if there was a history of head trauma, said, “Couple of barstools. Not really.”

Boston was his name. We rounded on him first each morning.

What Boston wanted was to teach me how to play Tunk. Tunk’s something they play on the streets. It’s an easy rummy.

The deal was, when he got out of here, we’d find a game beneath one of the overpasses. I’d pay in all well-dressed, using big words nobody understood—get them to think I just gave money away—then clean up: my book smarts, his street smarts kind of thing. Split everything down the middle. Our plan became so intricate, I forgot about the liver study.

Ricardo Nuila is an assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He teaches internal medicine and medical humanities and works as a hospitalist. His stories have appeared in McSweeney’s, Ninth Letter, The Indiana Review, and Best American Short Stories, and his essays have appeared in The New England Journal of Medicine.


And Jacqueline Kolosov’s “Lessons from the Master”

“You would not have known me a year ago. A year ago I had a distinguished husband and a satisfying part-time job teaching painting and figure drawing at the university where he had tenure. A year ago I still awoke in the house where we had raised our daughter. Every morning from May until late September, I’d open the bedroom window onto the garden and look out at what I had created. In the shade were the well-established hostas, ferns, and columbine. The fence enclosing the garden was trellised with the decades’ old dowager roses—Bourbon, Damask, Floribunda, Sempervirens—I had admired since first visiting the Borghese Gardens during the early years of my marriage.

Jacqueline Kolosov’s creative prose and poetry have recently appeared in Cimarron Review, Terrain.org, and Literature & Belief.. An essay from her collection-in-progress, Motherhood and the Places Between, won Bellevue Literary Review’s 2012 nonfiction award. Her third poetry collection, Memory of Blue, is forthcoming from Salmon Poetry in May 2013.

More updates soon…
MEP

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Camera Crew and Contributor Updates

January 31st, 2013
Tim Horvath, Bellevue Literary Press 2012

Tim Horvath, Bellevue Literary Press 2012

 I am often slow to post these updates and certainly don’t post them often enough, leaving major accomplishments to back up. Tim Horvath, friend and charter member of the Camera Crew, has received a host of praise recently for his collection Understories released in May 2012 by Bellevue Literary Press.  If you have not yet read it, or intend to but haven’t had the time, bump it immediately to the top of your to do list.

A couple of years ago, when combing through stories for the journal, I described a story in the submission queue as a Calvinoesque- Spike Lee joint, and Tim took to that description enough to want it someday for a blurb on a novel. While not the intersection of Calvino and Spike Lee, Understories is much more, perhaps even something as wondrous as the love child of Nikola Tesla and an Easter Island head. This collection will not only cause you to look at the world a little differently but see it differently as well. Understories more than lives up to the praise it has received. Congratulations, Tim, from the entire Camera Crew.

 Tamas Dobozy whose story “The Selected Mugshots of Famous Hungarian Assassins” appears in the Autumnal 2012 Camera Obscura, recently won the Rogers Writers’ Trust of Canada Fiction Prize (One of Canada’s most prestigious awards) with his collection Seige 13, which was also Finalist for the 2012 Governor General’s Literary Award for English-Language Fiction. Published by Thomas Allen Publishers in Canada, it will be released by Milkweed Editions in February in the US.

Dzanc Books published Jennifer Spiegel’s collection, The Freak Chronicles, in 2012 containing the story “Killing Castro,” also appearing in  Camera Obscura 5. Congratulations Jennifer.

Rosebud Ben-Oni’s  first book of poems, Solecsim, will be published by Virtual Artists Collective in early 2013. Her story “A Way out of the Colonia” won the Camera Obscura Prize in our second issue.  

Peter Tieryas Liu’s collection of twenty short stories, Watering Heaven,was realeased from Signal 8 Press in fall of 2012. Learn more (including a trailer) on his website. Peter’s collection includes the story “A Wolf’s Choice,” which appeared in Camera Obscura 2 and can be read online here.

 

Issue 6 is beginning to take shape. Updates coming soon.

-MEP

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Camera Obscura number 5 Now Available

September 26th, 2012

 

The new issue has shipped and should be available in bookstores any day. Here is an [un-updated] list of where to buy the journal or subscribe online.

Congratulations to Adam Peterson whose story “It Goes Without Saying” in Camera Obscura 3 is listed as a notable story in this year’s Best American Short Stories.

Many thanks to all the new subscribers. Your support is very much appreciated.
Number 6 is in the aether, and when it takes a shape, I will post it here.
-MEP

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The Autumnal Issue – 2012

July 6th, 2012

 

The Autumnal 2012 issue of Camera Obscura Journal of Literature & Photography has now been curated and will include stories by Tamas Dobozy, David Ellis Dickerson, Anne Valente, Nathan Alling Long, Emily Koon, Omolola Ijeoma Ogunyemi, Jennifer Spiegel, and Keith Rosson. This fifth installment is due in late August, the perfect time for one of those great American summer road trips, and, if you pick up a copy, you will find yourself in the Orca Motor Inn of Wisconsin Dells where Keith Rosson’s intricate story “Hospitality” unravels:
 

“The orca is a monolith crafted in plaster. It rises from the roof of the motel, twenty-seven feet from base to snout, its flesh ridged and bumped, flaking paint to show its psoriatic underpinnings. Spattered in birdshit new and old, it has become the physical embodiment of all of Sam’s worries and loathing. It is as if the Orca Motor Inn were some sea that the beast was dissatisfied with. Its once-white belly is now yellowed and cracked, its fins sun bleached gray, it looks less majestic – what his father had presumably been hoping for when he’d built the motel forty years ago – than Mesozoic, something ancient and wrath-like and more than a little scary…”

There are 24 rooms in the Orca, most of which are now unoccupied, but Anne Valente’s archivist has probably catalogued everything that has ever happened in each one of them. “The Archivist” begins:

“Julie Powell: 587,436,974 breaths, from the first choking, light-filled gasp to the last exhalation, a dimmed sigh in the darkened oncology corridor of Lincoln Memorial.  91,467 kisses, a low number, her husband a man who shunned her affections, though Julie made up for this on the side with their part-time maid, a secret she kept until the moment of her death, alongside 44 others: that she’d cheated on a chemistry test in the eleventh grade, glancing over Eugene Harrold’s shoulder, that she hated her mother’s famous lemon cookies, that her husband only made her orgasm twice, though she pretended in shrieking climax more times than she’d been able to count (956 on file)…”

 The issue will also include the powerful work of over eighteen photographers to be mentioned in a week or so.

More updates soon…

-MEP

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And the winner is …

June 12th, 2012

 

The competition continues to grow, which makes culling the list of exceptional work increasingly challenging. As we try to do for every contest, our judges vary in style and focus. Judging this competition were Laurie Klein and Kerry Jordan, as well as Michael Gilbert whose work has been featured at the International Museum of Photography and is collected internationally as part of the collections of Epson, Canon, Hahnemuhle, Olympus, Mitsubishi, and Kodak. In 2006 he was a featured photographer at Photokina, the worlds largest photography event. (links to the work of these exciting photographers can soon be found in the darkroom).

The winner of the Camera Obscura Journal summer 2012 prize for professional photography is:
Heather Evans Smith for her image “The Midway”

Editor’s Choice for professionals is Larry Louie for his photograph “Sewing”

The winner of the Camera Obscura Journal prize for non-professional photography is:
Hugh Jones for “into the stream”

The Editor’s Choice in this category goes to Pierre Hauser for “On the Edge”

For the complete list of results (along with some images of previous winners).
Many of the finalists will be included in the upcoming Camera Obscura Journal due out in August of 2012.

Here are the guidelines for the Winter Photography Competition (already underway).

-MEP

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Finally a winner…

December 5th, 2011

 

“The Rural Trio” by Rui Pires of Portugal takes top prize for professionals in the Camera Obscura Journal Photography Competition. His winning image will appear in the forthcoming issue which will hit bookstores in January. Nenad Saljic wins for the amateur category with “Matterhorn: Sunset Clouds.” The editor’s choice award goes to Saeed Rezvanian for his mystifying photograph “Before The Beginning” in the professional category (which will also anchor the cover of this issue) and Nenad Saljic gets the amateur editor’s choice nod for his Matterhorn series.

Thank you to our judges Carl Caylor, Cheri McCallum, and Carol Andrews Jensen for your commitment to our endeavor in support of professional and amateur photographers around the world.

As far as notable standouts, a complete list of finalists can be found here Results. They all qualify as notable.

As always, thanks for all the enthusiasm and support.

The Vernal issue of Camera Obscura Journal will hit bookstores sometime in January.

Guidelines for the current contest with a deadline of March 15, 2012 can be found or here .

-MEP

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Photography Competition Finalists Announced

November 16th, 2011

 

We don’t yet have the winners in the Camera Obscura Journal Winter 2011 Photography Competition, but the following finalists’ images are now in the hands of the judges. We had some tough choices to make with so much great work submitted. Many thanks to all who entered and for your support in helping us provide a needed platform for artistically accomplished and technically superior photography. The results for the competition with a deadline of September 15th are listed below:

Professional Category
Finalists
Brian T. Silak – “Fall Tree”
Andrei Iliescu – “Cinema Show”
Julie Ziesemann – “ourself concealed”
Chan Kwok Hung – “Working In The Morning”
Mike Haley – “Pas de Deux”
Cynthia Walpole – “Green-crowned Brilliant 8562”
Tina Jokitalo – “Fly away little bird”
Bill Brokaw – “Christina the Redeemer”
Saeed Rezvanian – “Before The Beginning”
Saeed Rezvanian – “Inside”
Nicola Taylor – “Music for those who listen”
Nicola Taylor – “La Que Sabe”
Rui Pires – “The Eagle´s Girl”
Rui Pires – “The Rural Trio”
Jennifer Georgescu – “Sand, Stones, Dead Leaves and Bones”
Tom Wundrak- “Woman by the window reading a book”
Fabio Affuso – “Antoni Lobetti”
Manuel Cosentino – “Behind a Little House (Series)”
Stephanie Saclolo – “of deception or deliverance?”
 
Non-Professional Category
Finalists
Guilherme Stoner – “No bar, no woman, no life…”
Anna Rowser – “To Sleep, Perchance to Dream”
Nenad Saljic – “A church inside a church 1”
Nenad Saljic – “Into the Mist”
Nenad Saljic – “Matterhorn: Twilight Clouds”
Nenad Saljic – “Matterhorn: Sunset Clouds”
Nenad Saljic – “Petrified 1”
Nenad Saljic – “Solitude 4”
Dennis Hodges – “Fall” from the series 1 tree 4 seasons”
Dennis Hodges – series – “A modern relationship”
Dennis Hodges – “Urban flamingos”
Sabato Visconti – “The Boy that Stayed and the Boy that Went”

Thanks again. More news to come.
-MEP

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